Why are Summit Students Moving Abroad?

By Hannah Kenneth, News Editor During the college research process, one can’t help but be entranced by the rustic brick buildings of historic New England schools and the sun-soaked, palm tree-lined campuses of California schools. Coupled with the prestigious academic reputations that flank many of these universities, one might wonder why you would ever need to leave the U.S. for college. Newsflash: there’s a lot … Continue reading Why are Summit Students Moving Abroad?

Questioning over Quarantine: How a Pandemic Sparked a Wave of Gender Awakening

By Natasha Visnack, Crest Editor We’ve seen the changes, whether it be in Instagram bios or on name tags on Webex. We’ve all noticed that the little white text that once read “she/her” or “he/him” now reads “she/they”, “he/they” or “they/them.” We’ve taken note of the miniature rainbow flags now adorning TikTok bios and the new names many have requested to be called by as … Continue reading Questioning over Quarantine: How a Pandemic Sparked a Wave of Gender Awakening

Why I invested Half of My Life Savings into GameStop

By Charlie Hobin, Staff Writer Like many other teenagers over the past year, my friends and I made the transition from winning Fortnite games late into the night, to waking up at 6 AM live chatting about stocks while looking at charts, making trades, and scrolling the infinite pages of Reddit looking for the next big trade.  One morning in Mid-January, as we were talking … Continue reading Why I invested Half of My Life Savings into GameStop

Childhood Trends: Teens Try to Find Normalcy in the Face of A Pandemic

By Brooke Leggat, Sports Editor It’s 6A.M on a Tuesday morning. Subarus decked out with Summit and Bend High stickers line the Fred Meyer parking lot as piles of ambitious teenagers bombard the grocery store’s front doors. They are on the hunt for plushie stuffed animals named Squishmallows, hoping the shelves have been restocked.  As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on every aspect … Continue reading Childhood Trends: Teens Try to Find Normalcy in the Face of A Pandemic

Back to School: What Does this Mean for Teachers?

 By Sasha Stringer, Staff Writer  Shortly after a School Board discussion, a decision was made that would impact every student, family and faculty member in the Bend-LaPine School District: Students were returning to in-person school. After the announcement of the new hybrid model, many were thrilled to get back to a schedule that didn’t involve waking up only to sit hunched over a computer all … Continue reading Back to School: What Does this Mean for Teachers?

Zoom Trading: Gen-Z takes on the Stock Market

By Charlie Hobin, Staff Writer As Boomers transitioned into adulthood, finance and investing in the stock market was a far-off, complex world that only existed in sleek skyscrapers and unwieldy flip phones. 35 years later, teenagers now have access to buy and sell any stock in any company on a small rectangular screen in the midst of a boring Zoom english class. New simplified, easy … Continue reading Zoom Trading: Gen-Z takes on the Stock Market

Us vs Them: An Inside Look at Schools in Different States During a Pandemic

By Wesley Gilbride, Staff Writer States across America look completely different, ranging from beach, to mountain, to desert, to forest, to plains. Political views also range in this same way. Red and blue states are viewed very differently, Covid-19 protocols differ as well as how school looks for students and teachers. According to the Covid-19 map by New York Times in Deschutes County, 1 in … Continue reading Us vs Them: An Inside Look at Schools in Different States During a Pandemic

College Applications: COVID-19 Edition

By Hannah Kenneth, News Editor Junior year. Pandemic. Lockdown. Online school. Senior year. National Election. Riots in the Capitol. These challenges have defined the last 365 days of the class of 2021’s lives and if there’s one thing we can agree on, it’s that life is not peachy keen right now. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Life appears bleak and each month releases a … Continue reading College Applications: COVID-19 Edition

Doomsday: Earth’s Seven Year Countdown

By Emily Orman, Sports Editor In 7 years, 86 days, 12 hours, 13 minutes, 20 seconds, the world’s new “climate clock” will hit zero. That’s how much time we have left until Earth’s doomsday: the day in which climate change becomes irreversible. On September 17th, the famous Metronome clock in New York City began to flash a new message, far more daunting than the typical … Continue reading Doomsday: Earth’s Seven Year Countdown

Student Spotlight: Living with Coronavirus

By Barbara Norton, Editor-in-Chief As the Coronavirus continues to spread both globally and locally, infection is on everyone’s minds: Are you feeling feverish—or just warm? Is that cough because of allergies… or something more deadly?  Though symptom lists and death rates dominate everything from neighborly conversations to the national news cycle, few people know what it’s like to actually be sick with Coronavirus. We sat … Continue reading Student Spotlight: Living with Coronavirus

Corona Corrects the Environment: Fighting an Invisible Change

Lucy Jones: The miraculous return of dolphins to southern Italy—some of the first positive news many of us heard in the midst of the pandemic. Although Covid-19 has caused global catastrophe—in everyone’s day-to-day lives, in the economy, in the workforce—it has also helped restore and revive aspects of the natural world that might not have been feasible otherwise. With the whole world on pause, carbon … Continue reading Corona Corrects the Environment: Fighting an Invisible Change

The Teacher’s Trouble: Technology

By: Parker Meredith A yellow light cascades over the teacher’s glasses and greying hair. He sits alone in the dark as the soft music plays, and the melodic tapping of his computer keyboard fills the air. It’s Monday night, March 31, 2020. Just two days before students return to learning, this time virtually. The teacher, who struggles greatly with technology, is forced to learn how … Continue reading The Teacher’s Trouble: Technology

Seniors Step into an Unpredictable Workforce

By: Lucy Jones As I watch my sister complete her fourth year of college—now with an unexpected twist—it’s clear the struggle she’s facing: no formal graduation, no chance for celebratory travel and, most alarmingly, a widespread hiring freeze. As for her life’s next venture, only more uncertainty awaits. She’s questioning when and how she’ll be able to get a job. And what will the job … Continue reading Seniors Step into an Unpredictable Workforce

The Novel Nation : Life After A Pandemic

By Charlie Hobin    Like a deer prancing across the highway, the Covid-19 Pandemic brought society across the globe to a screeching halt. Millions lounge around engaged in the infinity of Netflix while questioning, “when will we go back to normal?” Scientists, Politicians, and Pundits of all kinds are unsure of when this emancipation day will arrive, but one thing is certain, this future normal will … Continue reading The Novel Nation : Life After A Pandemic

Compassion in Quarantine: How Spreading Love Can Help Us Survive the Pandemic

By Natasha Visnack Over the past 2 weeks my dining room table has been overtaken with piles of bent sewing pins, bits of loose thread, and a gigantic mint sewing machine. These implements of construction have set up residence, banishing my family and me to eat our sad leftovers at the kitchen counter. Around my buried table disorderly stacks of paisley fabric cling to our … Continue reading Compassion in Quarantine: How Spreading Love Can Help Us Survive the Pandemic

Average Quaran-teens: A Tale of Two Students

By Julia Burdsall and Mimi Dioguardi Student 1: It’s 7:30am and the sound of my sencha alarm violently interrupts my trip to the bikini bottom with my dog. Just like yesterday I am rudely transported back into the reality of living in “quarantine” attempting to finish my junior year strong before the last of my motivation takes its much- deserved sabbatical. I head downstairs to … Continue reading Average Quaran-teens: A Tale of Two Students

How the Office Group Can Help You

By: Hannah Kenneth A stone’s throw away from the home of the Storm lies a secret sanctuary known as the Office Group (TOG), where a handful of students can get some much-needed help and guidance. You may catch these students talking with Betsy Kohler (resident math tutor and faux-mom), heating up some Cup Noodles in the makeshift kitchen or gazing at the U.S. map dotted … Continue reading How the Office Group Can Help You

In the City

By: Jess McComb I stood there in the slight drizzle, slouched under my hood, eyes locked on the pebbled ground as I waited. A streetcar arrived with a quiet clatter, white noise to city dwellers and a peculiar nuance to its visitors. I stepped aboard the car, casually gripping the steel bars as if it were a habit. Greeted by a new environment, my eyes … Continue reading In the City

Trash Bros : Dutch Bros’ waste problem

By Hannah Kenneth Upon returning to school from lunch, Storm students can expect to be greeted by an abundance of things: the smell of car exhaust, half drank Dutch Bros drinks and grease-stained Mcdonalds bags hanging out of overflowing green trash bins. For many, this is the norm and the amount of waste and pollution being created stays under student’s noses.  It’s not news that … Continue reading Trash Bros : Dutch Bros’ waste problem