Zoom Trading: Gen-Z takes on the Stock Market

By Charlie Hobin, Staff Writer As Boomers transitioned into adulthood, finance and investing in the stock market was a far-off, complex world that only existed in sleek skyscrapers and unwieldy flip phones. 35 years later, teenagers now have access to buy and sell any stock in any company on a small rectangular screen in the midst of a boring Zoom english class. New simplified, easy … Continue reading Zoom Trading: Gen-Z takes on the Stock Market

Us vs Them: An Inside Look at Schools in Different States During a Pandemic

By Wesley Gilbride, Staff Writer States across America look completely different, ranging from beach, to mountain, to desert, to forest, to plains. Political views also range in this same way. Red and blue states are viewed very differently, Covid-19 protocols differ as well as how school looks for students and teachers. According to the Covid-19 map by New York Times in Deschutes County, 1 in … Continue reading Us vs Them: An Inside Look at Schools in Different States During a Pandemic

COVID-19 Causes Clubs to Adapt

By Bailey Martin, Staff Writer After 10 months of quarantine and a world of constant adaptation, Summit clubs needed to find new ways to keep students involved. New clubs, such as the Science Bowl Club, were founded while school has been online and have shown huge growth in student participation, whereas older clubs have seen a small decrease in engagement all together. Virtual limitations hindered … Continue reading COVID-19 Causes Clubs to Adapt

Return to in-person learning: How the district plans to send students back into the classroom

By Thomas Schwiebert, Opinions Editor Gathered rather unceremoniously on a Webex call populated by some 20 members, the Bend-La Pine School District’s School Board discussed the fate of almost 20,000 students, teachers and staff on Jan 12. Despite the unyielding Covid-19 pandemic, schools around the country have grown increasingly anxious to get students—specifically younger learners—back into an in-person educational environment. During the nearly four-hour-long board … Continue reading Return to in-person learning: How the district plans to send students back into the classroom

We’re All Virtually Absent Here: Why—and How Attendance This Year Needs to Change

By Emi Smart, Staff Writer  Suddenly, the door opens, and a middle aged woman with glasses and a clipboard walks in. It’s Ms. Landis, the campus monitor. “Can I speak with Emily Smart for a moment?” she asks. The whole class looks up from their phones and glares at me. I sigh, and walk out behind her. “You have two unexcused absences from two weeks … Continue reading We’re All Virtually Absent Here: Why—and How Attendance This Year Needs to Change

College Applications: COVID-19 Edition

By Hannah Kenneth, News Editor Junior year. Pandemic. Lockdown. Online school. Senior year. National Election. Riots in the Capitol. These challenges have defined the last 365 days of the class of 2021’s lives and if there’s one thing we can agree on, it’s that life is not peachy keen right now. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Life appears bleak and each month releases a … Continue reading College Applications: COVID-19 Edition

Diversity and Equity Club: Critical Connections for Our Community

By Viansa Reid, Editor-in-Chief The Diversity and Equity Club (DEC) focuses on helping students feel accepted at Summit, emphasizing the importance of including people of all backgrounds and identities. Because Bend is predominantly white, it can be difficult for people of color to feel welcome, the  DEC reasoned. “I think [the club] has become more of a comfortable place for people to just hang out, … Continue reading Diversity and Equity Club: Critical Connections for Our Community

New XC Coach Ensures Athletes are Healthy in Mind and Body: A Look at RED-S

By Ellie Skjersaa, News Editor The stereotypical daily routine of a cross country runner consists of eating oatmeal and running for an obscene amount of time, but what people don’t get to see is the behind the scenes of how much work goes into shaping a successful long distance runner.  As a runner on the Summit cross-country team, let me tell you- physical therapy has … Continue reading New XC Coach Ensures Athletes are Healthy in Mind and Body: A Look at RED-S

Mt. Bachelor: Parking Reservations Gone Amok

By Jess McComb, Features Editor It was a Tuesday morning, Mt. Bachelor had received some much needed snow the night before and I was jonesing for that Northwest Bowl powder. Of course, a parking pass is the modern equivalent to gold for local ski enthusiasts and by that standard, my trek to the mountain was not made alone. Accompanying me in the cramped space of … Continue reading Mt. Bachelor: Parking Reservations Gone Amok

Online Learning: The Positive Effects on Mental Health of Students

By Ella Messih, Staff Writer It’s a Wednesday morning. I roll out of bed to check my phone, and the clock reads 10:30. I slowly make my way out of bed with ease, not a care in the world. Life is good. How could I complain with the current online school climate due to Covid-19, when what used to be my biggest challenge and anxiety … Continue reading Online Learning: The Positive Effects on Mental Health of Students

Club Activities: For Passion or for Resume Padding?

By Brooke Leggat, Sports Editor With the surging tension of the college application season, many high school students feel  compelled to stack their resumes with a top-notch GPA, unsurpassable standardized test scores and remarkable college essays. For decades these three pillars have carried the academic weight for college applicants across the country. But, increasingly, high-school students are expected to be well-rounded. Colleges and universities, moved … Continue reading Club Activities: For Passion or for Resume Padding?

Kevista: Coffee with a side of Covid-19

By Julia Burdsall, Editor-in-Chief New to the scene, Kevista Coffee, widely known as “Kevista,” joined the Westside’s coffee community in 2019. Nestled between Dutch Bros and First Interstate bank and housed in the old Skjersaa’s building on Century, Kevista captured one of the most prime locations in Bend—making them the new hot spot for locals, tourists and evening workaholics with a crippling caffeine addiction. The … Continue reading Kevista: Coffee with a side of Covid-19

Lil Storm: Behind Summit’s SoundCloud Scene

By Barbara Norton, Editor-in-Chief In the mid-2010’s, teens made the switch from DIY duct tape wallets to DIY hip-hop, thanks in part to the popularization of music-sharing platform SoundCloud. Characterized by its complete lack of gatekeeping, SoundCloud gave any humble hopeful the chance at a golden ticket—instead of touring the Chocolate factory, though, they’d get a record deal and worldwide fame.  For SoundCloud’s early success … Continue reading Lil Storm: Behind Summit’s SoundCloud Scene

The Age of Virtual Theatre: How Summit theatre is adapting to Covid-19 restrictions and a virtual environment

By Emma Andersen, Staff Writer Amidst a devastating pandemic, schools across the U.S. have tried adapting their online platforms to support a virtual theatre experience that keeps participants engaged and learning—but it’s proved to be a struggle. Despite the difficulties, Summit’s theatre club and various classes have successfully adapted to create a slew of events and opportunities that allow students to further their techniques while … Continue reading The Age of Virtual Theatre: How Summit theatre is adapting to Covid-19 restrictions and a virtual environment

Trashy Volunteering; When Doing Good Isn’t So Great

By Natasha Visnack, Crest Editor Over winter break, homeless camps across bend received cardboard boxes of food. These boxes, filled with raw potatoes, onions, and other perishable foods requiring kitchen appliances to prepare, were left by a mysterious philanthropist, who—inspired by the holiday spirit—decided to feed the homeless. Despite the fact that most of the people living in these roadside camps struggle with hunger, the … Continue reading Trashy Volunteering; When Doing Good Isn’t So Great

COVID: Stop the Judgment and Look for Hope

By Lucy Jones, Crest Editor “Take off those silly things,” said my 80 year old grandmother, a woman who beat severe pancreatic cancer only a year ago. My family and I, masked up, were seeing grandma at her house for the first time since the pandemic began. It seemed absurd that she did not take our caution more seriously. But, from her perspective, all she … Continue reading COVID: Stop the Judgment and Look for Hope

Doomsday: Earth’s Seven Year Countdown

By Emily Orman, Sports Editor In 7 years, 86 days, 12 hours, 13 minutes, 20 seconds, the world’s new “climate clock” will hit zero. That’s how much time we have left until Earth’s doomsday: the day in which climate change becomes irreversible. On September 17th, the famous Metronome clock in New York City began to flash a new message, far more daunting than the typical … Continue reading Doomsday: Earth’s Seven Year Countdown

Defunding Planned Parenthood? Might as Well Say Taking Away Our Rights

By Ellie Skjersaa, News Editor Orange leaves line the sidewalks throughout the city of Bend and Trump and Biden’s dueling campaign signs stand proudly in people’s front yards. The year is 2020—the year of a worldwide pandemic, the year of the Black Lives Matter campaign, and hopefully the year we get a new president. Trump has recently announced that, if reelected, he plans to defund … Continue reading Defunding Planned Parenthood? Might as Well Say Taking Away Our Rights

Student Spotlight: Living with Coronavirus

By Barbara Norton, Editor-in-Chief As the Coronavirus continues to spread both globally and locally, infection is on everyone’s minds: Are you feeling feverish—or just warm? Is that cough because of allergies… or something more deadly?  Though symptom lists and death rates dominate everything from neighborly conversations to the national news cycle, few people know what it’s like to actually be sick with Coronavirus. We sat … Continue reading Student Spotlight: Living with Coronavirus

The Rise of Videogames During Quarantine

By Viansa Reid, Editor-in-Chief My friends and I whip out our phones, log on to “Among Us” and start the game. I’m an Imposter. So is Iz. We corner people to kill them and vent to stay unsuspected, but someone has found a dead body. Already? Who are people suspecting? Kai says Mel and everyone agrees. I follow Quinn into Storage, pretending to do tasks … Continue reading The Rise of Videogames During Quarantine